New Year’s Eve Celebrations

The Origins of the New Year Celebrations

London - Big Ben

The celebration of the new year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, the Babylonian New Year began with the first New Moon (actually the first visible cresent) after the Vernal Equinox (first day of spring).
The beginning of spring is a logical time to start a new year. After all, it is the season of rebirth, of planting new crops, and of blossoming. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.
The Babylonian new year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year’s Eve festivities pale in comparison.
During the Middle Ages, the Church remained opposed to celebrating New Years.

January 1 has been celebrated as a holiday by Western nations for only about the past 400 years.

Paris - Champs Elysee

How to bring Luck for the coming Year
Traditionally, it was thought that one could affect the luck they would have throughout the coming year by what they did or ate on the first day of the year. For that reason, it has become common for folks to celebrate the first few minutes of a brand new year in the company of family and friends. Parties often last into the middle of the night after the ringing in of a new year. It was once believed that the first visitor on New Year’s Day would bring either good luck or bad luck the rest of the year. It was particularly lucky if that visitor happened to be a tall dark-haired man. From this came the usage of asking a “Chimmney Sweep” to be the first through the front door after midnight.

Sydney Harbour Bridge - Australia

New Year Food for Good Luck
Traditional New Year foods are also thought to bring luck. Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes “coming full circle,” completing a year’s cycle.

In Holland:  the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year’s Day will bring good fortune.
Many parts of the U.S. celebrate the new year by consuming black-eyed peas. These legumes are typically accompanied by either hog jowls or ham. Black-eyed peas and other legumes have been considered good luck in many cultures. The hog, and thus its meat, is considered lucky because it symbolizes prosperity.
Cabbage is another “good luck” vegetable that is consumed on New Year’s Day by many. Cabbage leaves are also considered a sign of prosperity, being representative of paper currency. In some regions, rice is a lucky food that is eaten on New Year’s Day.
In Italy lentils and zampone or pigs trotters are eaten, the lentils signifying wealth for the coming year. When bell tolls midnight – one spoon per bell is eaten. This is supposed to bring good fortune; the lentils represent coins, being round in shape.
In Spain The ritual on New Year’s eve is to eat twelve grapes at midnight. The tradition is meant to secure twelve happy months in the coming year.
In Greece, New Year’s day is also the Festival of St. Basil, one of the founders of the Greek Orthodox Church. One of the traditional foods served is Vassilopitta, or St Basil’s cake. A silver or gold coin is baked inside the cake. Whoever finds the coin in their piece of cake will be especially lucky during the coming year.

Brandenburg Gate - Berlin

The Origins of the ritual of Toasting
One of the most venerable New Years traditions is the champaign toast at midnight to ring in the new year. Toasting can be traced back to the ancient Romans and Greeks who would pour wine, to be shared among those attending a religious function, from a common pitcher. The host would drink first, to assure his guests that the wine was not poisoned. Poisoning the wine was a fairly common practice in ancient times, designed to do away with one’s enemies. In those days the wine was not as refined as it is today so a square of burned bread (toast) would be floated in the wine bowl and then eaten by the last person to drink. The bread was put there to absorb the extra acidity of the wine in order to make it more palatable. Eventually, the act of drinking in unison came to be called a toast, from the act of “toasting” or putting toast into the wine.

Tapei - New Year's Eve

Singing Auld Lang Syne
The song, “Auld Lang Syne,” playing in the background, is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700’s, it was first published in 1796 after Burns’ death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. An old Scottish tune, “Auld Lang Syne” literally means “old long ago,” or simply, “the good old days.”.

The Pope's New Years Blessing

Celebrate at Castello Dal Pozzo

Enjoy New Year’s Eve at Castello Dal Pozzo on Lake Maggiore, in the company of Stefania Cento, TV showgirl, who will entertain guests until 02.00am.
Festivities start at 8.00pm, continue with champagne toasts at midnight and continue until the small hours with dancing in the Ballroom.

www.castellodalpozzo.com for reservations


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2 Responses to New Year’s Eve Celebrations

  1. […] New Year’s Eve Celebrations (maizebread.wordpress.com) Sharing is Caring:MoreLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. This entry was posted in Nutrition, Recipes and tagged cabbage, fish, lentils, New Years Day, noodles, pomegranate by Nourish. Bookmark the permalink. […]

  2. […] New Year’s Eve Celebrations (maizebread.wordpress.com) […]

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